Pharyngeal Size in Snorers, Nonsnorers, and Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

New England Journal of Medicine, 1986 Authors: T. D. Bradley, I. G. Brown, R. F. Grossman, N. Zamel, D. Martizez, E. A Phillipson, and V. Hoffstein Conclusion: “In summary, our findings indicate that patients with obstructive sleep apnea and snorers without apnea have abnormalities of the anatomical and mechanical features of the pharynx that distinguish…

Pharyngieal Compliance in Snoring Subjects with and without Obstructive Sleep Apnea

American Review of Respiratory Disease, 1985 Authors: I. G. Brown, T. D. Bradley, E. A. Phillipson, N. Zamel, and V. Hoffstein Conclusion: “Previous studies employing the acoustic reflection technique, X- ray cephalometry, fluoroscopy, and computerized tomography have shown reduced upper airway caliber in patients with OSA. Our results confirm these findings by demonstrating that patients…

Lung volume Dependence of Pharyngeal Cross-Sectional Area in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

American Review of Respiratory Disease, 1984 Authors: V. Hoffstein, N. Zamel, and E. A. Phillipson Conclusion: “We examined the relationship between lun volume and pharyngeal cross-sectional area (with acoustic reflection) in 9 obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea and 10 age-matched, obese subjects without sleep apnea. The results indicate that in obese patients with obstructive…

Upper Airway Morphology in Patients with Idiopathic Obstructive Sleep Apnea

American Review of Respiratory Disease, 1984 Authors: J. Rivlin, V. Hoffstein, J. Kalbfleisch, W. MnNicholas, N. Zamel, and A. C. Bryan Conclusion: “The acoustic technique is performed in the awake state and needs a minimal degree of patient cooperation. The good correlation between pharyngeal cross-sectional area and the severity of the disorder may give us…

Acoustic Reflection Technology for Assessing Pharyngeal Size — faster, more specific, lower cost

American Review of Respiratory Disease, 1984 Authors: Rivlin, Hoffstein, Kalbfleisch, McNicholas, Zamel, Bryan Conclusion: “This study demonstrates that sitting awake patients with idiopathic OSA have significantly smaller cross sectional areas of the pharynx and the glottis than do subjects without OSA. This study also demonstrates and anatomic predisposition to the development of upper airway occlusion…